Anonymous said: A lot of ballet tights can be bought seamless!

oooo! Good to know! Thank you!

Anonymous said: I really, really hate being touched. My girlfriend knows this, but she loves cuddling and hugging and all other sorts of things im not comfortable with. Whenever I say "no, I don't want to" she starts making it about herself and how sad she is that we can't be close. Should I tell her that she's guilt tripping me or something?

I think that some people only feel loved if they receive physical contact. I definitely don’t think she’s trying to be malicious, but she may be having a hard time understanding that for you, physical contact has the opposite reaction or feeling. Definitely sit down and talk to her about it, but don’t make it confrontational or accusative of her. Instead make it about how both of you need the opposite to feel loved and respected, and discuss ways to overcome that. Perhaps choose a word that for the two of you has a different meaning, or find something that the two of you can interact with instead that will act as a replacement for a person; say like a stuffed animal or a special pillow to hug and cuddle. I think there are ways to overcome this, but they might just not be entirely conventional to the way most people imagine relationships.
Good luck!

Anonymous said: Sought out blog/been following for my sensory-seeking 5 yr old... But with all the researching I've been more aware of my own "quirks" and "pet-peeves".. Makes me wonder what a professional would say! Anyhow, with so many people here as adults, I have kinda a sensitive/TMI question- how does your SPD, OCD etc affect your intimacy situations?.. Some of my "trigger", inside my head I'm freaking out kinda things are hygiene related.. :(

It’s wonderful to hear that you’re seeking sources to better understand and help your child! Kudos to you!

One thing about SPD is that many people have reported not being as bothered by their triggers when they come from certain people, or that it can be worsened when sounds/images/touch come from a specific person. There was one short documentary where a girl had misophonia and she was fine talking to her dad, but she couldn’t handle the sound of her mother’s voice.
I think that translates into intimacy situations the same way. For example, I don’t like hugging people because of the light touches people often end up delivering, but I seek out hugs from my boyfriend. 
I also don’t mind the sounds of his eating or breathing, or snoring at night. (It helps reassure me that he’s alive, if anything. :P )
I think for many, intimacy can be a hard thing to navigate with SPD, but I also believe that for some it’s easier than the day-to-day interactions they have with most people.
Any other thoughts or opinions?

Anonymous said: I wear earplugs most of the time because hearing is the most overstimulating sense for me, but sometimes I also want to shut down other senses to give myself a break. (I skip my allergy medication on purpose so I don't have to smell things, I close my eyes and avoid turning on lights, etc.) Does anyone else have tips for temporarily nullifying particular senses?

Anonymous said: i was watching a documentary about town councils the other night and there was this segment where there was this family reporting their neighbours for causing a nuisance with an extractor fan. but the noise from the fan was actually very quiet, the council gentleman couldn't even hear it... to me it was very obvious that the family had misophonia like me, but nobody in the documentary suggested it. i wish there was more awareness, i feel like that family would be happier to have an answer D:

Awareness is the first step to help so many people! Like most psychological and mental disorders in their early years of awareness, SPD isn’t widely accepted as a legitimate disorder in some medical circles. I hope as time goes on more awareness and studies are done to help bring it into the mainstream.

Anonymous said: I don't have sensory issues as bad as others do, but as a very little kid, I had almost constant ear infections. Now as a 21 year old, loud, constant sounds are some of the worst things to me. I had some speech and sensory issues but the school councilor helped with that, along with my ADHD. I'm fine with my music/headphones because I can physically control the sounds and use them to block out too-loud clutter, even if nothing is playing. (I used that a couple of weeks ago at an IMAX movie.)

I’m glad you’ve found a system of managing the overload that works for you!
On a related but also not related note, I also had a lot of ear infections as a baby and had to get tubes in my ears. We thought they had fallen out as I aged, but when I was 15 my doctor told me I needed to clear out my ears so he could see my eardrums. My mother and I squished out a huge chunk of wax and inside of it was one of my ear tubes. That’s one of my gross stories I hope you enjoyed it. :P

Anonymous said: I would give your sister little gifts to know that she is welcomed and loved in your family. Try drawing something for her if you like drawing, or if you like writing then write a poem that will let her feel accepted and if shes young, maybe you could write a story that she'll enjoy! You could also get her a stuffed animal, or some other sort of comfort toy so she still has something physical other than you. You are a wonderful person for caring about her this much. :)

Anonymous said: Those who have SPD, autism, or synesthesia tend to have overlapping symptoms of each other. Someone with SPD is definitely more likely to have synesthesia than a neurotypical person. Likewise to autism.

nobody-knows-im-a-cuttlefish said: I spent most of my childhood thinking my mum was joking when she said socks were supposed to be worn with the seams on the inside.

That’s why I love that I can knit my own socks now! I always do a decreased toe with a kitchener stitched seam (seamless weaving!!) rather than a turned toe with a standard seam. 
If only tights and stockings could be made seamless. ):

Anonymous said: I have a pet theory that my misophonia/spd is related to my synesthesia. Any followers who are synnies as well?? :)